Jon Snow, Channel 4 News Presenter & PRA Patron

 

I have chosen to lend my support to the PRA because I

believe this is innovative broadcasting to a quite literally captive audience… the potential in all sorts of ways is enormous.

The Prison Radio Association (PRA) aims to change the lives of serving prisoners through the power of radio.

An award-winning education charity, the PRA runs National Prison Radio (NPR) in partnership with the National Offender Management Service (NOMS). The service is available to prisoners across England and Wales directly in their cells.

The PRA also provides support, guidance and expertise to existing prison radio projects and advises prisons interested in setting up radio projects and radio training facilities.

The PRA was established as a charity in 2006 in response to a growing demand from prisons to engage in prison radio.

Registered Charity Number – 1114760

Our programmes and campaigns

The Request Show

The Request Show

While music is part of everyday life for most people, the overwhelming majority of prisoners do not have access to a radio or a stereo. National Prison Radio therefore represents the only way most prisoners can listen to music. No programme on National Prison Radio has done more to encourage the aud... more→

The Information Centre

The Information Centre

Every prisoner remembers their first night in a prison cell. For most, it is a disorienting and stressful experience with a heady mix of emotions at play: fear, anger, confusion, worry, uncertainty. There is also a mountain of information and rules which prisoners have to learn very quickly, and get... more→

A Sound Fix

A Sound Fix

This Sony Radio Academy Gold Award-winning campaign delivered key messages to prisoners to inform and educate them about drug and alcohol misuse and to promote the support services offered in prisons and in the community upon release. The campaign was designed to encourage inmates to recognise their... more→

Reasons to Read – June 2011

Reasons to Read – June 2011

Almost half of the prison population has a reading level at or below the level expected of an 11 year old, a fact that can render these prisoners virtually unemployable and create a vicious circle that encourages reoffending beyond custody. Over two thirds of prisoners have difficulties reading pris... more→

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